Saturday, August 16, 2014


Before It's Too Late

Al Mohler is happy ... sort of. A Tennessee state court judge has disagreed with the consensus of judicial rulings since United States v. Windsor that banning same-sex marriage is a violation of the equal protection and/or due process provisions of the Fourteenth Amendment.

The issue in the Tennessee case was whether Tennessee had to consider and grant a divorce to two gay men legally married in Iowa. Al was particularly happy with this from the judge's decision:
Marriage can simply not be divorced from its traditional procreative purpose.
According to Al:
Christians looking at this judge's reasoning would recognize the very logical case that the judges [sic] made. A case based upon a rational objective understanding of what marriage is. Tying marriage not only to its historical structure but also to its recognized functions: procreation and the raising of children. And also the fact that as that stable, unifying institution of society, marriage rationally deserves the kind of protection that the state of Tennessee offered through this ban on same-sex marriage.
Al, of course, does not tell us how, rationally, banning same-sex marriage "protects" marriage or why the state still allows post-menopausal women, women who have had hysterectomies or men who have had vasectomies to marry if procreation is the rationale of the law.

In fact, Al goes on to demonstrate that his, and Christians in general, real objection is that they don't like some peoples' sexual and gender identities, by railing against a transgendered teacher and her elementary school, which is seeking to have its students understand and accept Rebecca (nee Robert) Reuter.

Al quotes Mary Hasson in some rag called The Federalist to the effect that:
It is unlikely that children are going to immediately buy into this. It's going to take some very sophisticated brain tampering to get them to accept what they're going to be told. Some kid, perhaps even the majority of children, when told that the individual for them who used to be Mr. Reuter is now Ms. Reuter is simply going to think, and perhaps even to say, "no he is not."
I seriously doubt that. Children are pretty accepting of change and different people. In fact, the process runs in the other direction. Rodgers and Hammerstein were right:

You've got to be taught
To hate and fear,
You've got to be taught
From year to year,
It's got to be drummed
In your dear little ear
You've got to be carefully taught.

You've got to be taught to be afraid
Of people whose eyes are oddly made,
And people whose skin is a diff'rent shade,
You've got to be carefully taught.

You've got to be taught before it's too late,
Before you are six or seven or eight,
To hate all the people your relatives hate,
You've got to be carefully taught!
You've got to be carefully taught!

Wikipedia has a brief entry on this song:

'… lawmakers in Georgia introduced a bill outlawing entertainment containing "an underlying philosophy inspired by Moscow."'

Not that long ago.

Yeah, I saw that. It also said:

One legislator said that "a song justifying interracial marriage was implicitly a threat to the American way of life."

As you say, not that long ago ... South Pacific came out in 1949, the year I was born.
Ah, but which Georgia?

I was born in 1949, too! January 8th - the date in 1697 Scottish student Thomas Aikenhead became the last person in Britain to be executed for blasphemy (actually for unwisely professing atheist sentiments before people he thought were friends, one of whom ratted him out to the authorities)

June 27th myself, oldster. I've never checked for or noticed any significant occurances on 6/27 but since that was MY date of birth, why should I expect anything more momentous than that? ;-)
Young whippersnapper! How about The Battle of Echoee?
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